Mythos & Marginalia

life notes; flaws and all

j.g. lewis

original content and images ©j.g. lewis

a daily breath...

A thought du jour, my daily breath includes collected and conceived observations, questions of life, fortune cookie philosophies, reminders, messages of peace and simplicity, unsolicited advice, inspirations, quotes and words that got me thinking. They may get you thinking too . . .

viewpoint


Vision obscured by common occurrence,

perhaps appearing disparate today, yet 

always hope for an alternate perspective.

    Hardly a coincidence, isolation may 

principally compound its influence or 

allow you to seek a different viewpoint.

Take notice, observation provides clarity.


05/21/2024                                                                                      j.g.l.

Mondays are just young Fridays

There.

 

Sit, quietly and comfortably, where you are.

 

Acknowledge the gradient nature of progress as it happens with the shades of past days inflecting a presence we don’t often respect.

 

Take your time.

 

Feel. Where you are.

 

At the intersection of faith and contentment you will gradually find your way.

 

Think about it.

 

Set your intentions.

 

Now rise, slowly and purposefully.

 

Look up, not only with your eyes but with your neck engaged in mindful movement.

 

Release the stiffness in your bones, allow energy to radiate from the spaces between.

 

Let the weight on your shoulders dissipate as you allow the arms to simply hang as if they are not even there.

 

Inhale. Exhale.

 

Each breath is as important as the next.

 

Breathe.

 

Exercise thankfulness, first and foremost to your self and the effort you have just expended.

 

Hold that thought.

 

You have already begun to experience the day.

 

Gratitude will follow with your next steps.

 

Share that feeling.

 

Enjoy this day.

 

 

 

05/20/2024                                                                        j.g.l.

cloud songs

      As it is and will be 
for the foreseeable future, there is 
only what remains behind the disguise.
   As natural as it has been, as
   astonishing as it occasionally seems, 
   we can only hope it will get better.
     Why is it we allow optimism 
     to dislimn all that is?
          Hope casts a lengthy shadow.
 

05/17/2024                                                                                j.g.l.

I'm like a pencil;
sometimes sharp,
most days
well-rounded,
other times
dull or
occasionally
broken.
Still I write.

j.g. lewis
is a writer/photographer in Toronto.

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The Big What If?

Posted on January 13, 2016 by j.g.lewis Leave a comment

_MG_4085 - Version 2

It is a thought-provoking question, and one often asked of others (and ourselves). What would you do if you won a million dollars? Or more?

It’s a question asked each week as I buy a lottery ticket. Actually I purchase several lottery tickets as part of little group at the office. Every week we pony up and buy a number of tickets for Friday’s big jackpot. We each chip in the equivalent of a half a ticket. It doesn’t seem like a lot of cash, but together it is more. It’s like anything else you do as a group; it has a greater impact (at least we hope).

As everybody puts their money on the table, there is always a wishful smile, and each of us utters one of those hopeful phrases like ‘maybe this time’, ‘cross your fingers’, ‘good luck to us, and of course the big ‘what if?’

We all know the chances are slim. The odds of winning a lottery are stacked against you.
Canadian statistics indicate the odds of winning are about one in 14 million. The odds of winning at least $15 million in the particular lottery we play are one in 28,633,528. And the chances decrease when the number of tickets sold increases. In the United States, where this week’s Powerball jackpot is an estimated $1.5 billion, the odds are one in 292 million. It’s not only astounding; it is somewhat humiliating to even think you, as an individual or small group, have any chance at all.

Technically, or realistically, the odds of us winning this week’s $50-million jackpot are unrealistically high — well past the odds of being killed by lightening or dying of flesh-eating disease — at more than one in 86,000,000.

That’s a lot of zeros, a whole lot of unlikely.

Still we try. It’s only three bucks, the price of a good latte or shot of mediocre whiskey. It’s worth that to us, individually and as a group, because pooling a few of our modest shekels, utilizing our communal power of positive thinking, gives us a chance to dream, albeit remotely, on the personal impact of a life-altering amount of money.

Somebody has to win all that cash, and maybe the stars will align just enough to let it be us. We’ve won a driblet or two along the way, some free tickets, and those $2, $5 or $10 prizes that come with having a few of the lucky numbers, but those winnings are ploughed back into tickets on the next week’s draw. We do it proudly, or with heightened optimism, like the prize money is somehow blessed. It does, incrementally, increase our chances, so even at those odds there is more hope.

Hope seems hard to come by, at times, in this uncertain economy. If a few bucks is going to buy me a little hope for the week, I’ll go without something like a muffin or magazine in favor of gaining something else. Even if it is just a little more hope.

After all, there is no point in hoping if you don’t buy into it. Like the lottery advertising says: You can’t win if you don’t play.

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